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Criminal Victimization in the United States, 1983

NCJ Number
96459
Date Published
August 1985
Author(s)
Marshall M. DeBerry, Bureau of Justice Statistics; Anita D. Timrots, Bureau of Justice Statistics
Publication Type
Publication
Annotation
Comprehensive statistical information about crime and its victims is presented in the 10th annual report based on results of the National Crime Survey (NCS).
Abstract

The NCS measures selected crimes, including offenses not reported to the police, by means of a large-scale and continuous household survey. Demographic and socioeconomic variables are used for gauging the degree to which persons across the Nation experienced criminal victimization during 1983. Data also are provided on certain characteristics of violent offenders, on the basic circumstances and outcomes of criminal incidents, and on patterns of reporting to the police. Interviews at 6-month intervals with the residents of a representative sample of about 59,000 housing units (126,000 persons age 12 and over) formed the basis for examining the following personal or household crimes: rape, robbery, assault, purse snatching, pocket picking, noncontact personal larceny, residential burglary, household larceny, and motor vehicle theft. Selected findings from 111 data tables are presented, together with summary findings and explanatory information. A survey methodology is appended to aid in the interpretation of survey results. Data for the report were collected by the U.S. Bureau of Census. This report includes the first presentation of data from a revised questionnaire that expands detail on a number of existing variables and includes new data on reasons for reporting crimes to the police. (Author abstract modified)

Date Created: January 17, 2012