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World Factbook of Criminal Justice Systems: Slovenia

NCJ Number
169772
Date Published
June 1993
Publication Type
Publication
Annotation
This overview of Slovenia's criminal justice system encompasses political and legal systems, the nature and extent of crime, victims, law enforcement, the prosecutorial and judicial process, the judicial system, penalties and sentencing, the prison system, and extradition and treaties.
Abstract

The political system of Slovenia is in a state of transition. The legal system has historically been based on the civil law system and the codification of laws. Major crime categories include criminal offenses, economic offenses, and petty offenses. The age of criminal responsibility is 15 years. Crime statistics for 1992 indicate 43 murders, 54 attempted murders, 60 rapes, 39 attempted rapes, and 176 drug law offenses were recorded. Victim assistance services are included in general assistance schemes. Victims play a limited role in prosecution but no direct role in sentencing. The police force has a three- tiered organizational structure: (1) state level (Ministry of Interior); (2) regional level (police administration departments); and (3) local level (police stations). Police officers are authorized to use deadly force, stop and apprehend suspects, and conduct searches and seizures. The prosecutorial and judicial process is concerned with rights of the accused and bringing suspects to trial. The judicial system is currently being restructured to include district courts, regional courts, and a high court. Sentencing decisions are made after guilt of the accused has been proven, and possible penalties include fines, imprisonment, institutional and noninstitutional psychiatric treatment, treatment for alcoholism and drug addiction, judicial warnings, and conditional sentences. Slovenia has 14 prisons with a currently adequate bed capacity of 2,257. Slovenia has signed extradition treaties with several European countries and Thailand and generally accepts all extradition legislation established by the former Yugoslavia. 8 references

Date Created: January 17, 2012