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Tribal Crime Data Collection Activities, 2012

NCJ Number
239077
Date Published
October 2012
Author(s)
Steven W. Perry, Bureau of Justice Statistics
Agencies
BJS
Publication Type
Publication
Annotation
Describes Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) activities to collect and improve data on crime and justice in Indian country, as required by the Tribal Law and Order Act, 2010.
Abstract

Describes Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) activities to collect and improve data on crime and justice in Indian country, as required by the Tribal Law and Order Act, 2010. The report summarizes BJS's comprehensive outreach and collaboration strategy to implement a census of courts operating in Indian country. It presents data from the 2010 Census of Population and Housing, which was conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau, about American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIAN), their tribal affiliations, and the populations of AIAN reservations and villages. It also includes federal justice statistics on federal suspects investigated and charges filed for offenses occurring in Indian country. The report describes tribal law enforcement agencies and the number of agencies with identifiable crime data in the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting Program. It summarizes tribal eligibility for Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) awards.2

Highlights
  • In 2010, the self-identified American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) population totaled 5.2 million, or 1.7% of the estimated 308.7 million people in the United States.
  • About 3.5 million (76%) of the 4.6 million people living on American Indian reservations or in Alaska Native villages in 2010 were not AIAN.
  • Tribally operated law enforcement agencies in Indian country employed 3,043 full-time equivalent (FTE) personnel in 2008.
Date Created: September 26, 2012