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Preventing Domestic Violence Against Women

NCJ Number
102037
Date Published
August 1986
Publication Type
Publication
Annotation
This report presents and interprets 1978-1982 National Crime Survey (NCS) data on married, divorced, and separated women who reported being victims of domestic violence at least once during a 1-year period. The analysis focuses on whether reporting the incident to the police increased or decreased victims' chances of being assaulted again.
Abstract

The NCS consisted of interviews twice each year with approximately 128,000 members of a nationally representative sample of 60,000 households. The data present the percent of total murders by relation of offender and victim; the victim-offender relationship in domestic violence; and the reporting of domestic violence to police, reason for reporting or not reporting, and who reported. Other data indicate the number of domestic violence victims subsequently assaulted, the rate of subsequent domestic violence, and the rate of more serious subsequent domestic violence by whether the police were called on the initial incident. Data also show the rate called on the initial incident. Data also show the rate of subsequent domestic violence by whether the police were called and by victim-offender relationship. Calling the police was associated with reduced risks of repeated violence, and there was no evidence that subsequent domestic assaults were more serious as a result of calling the police. 7 tables and 1 suggested reading.

Date Created: January 17, 2012